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June 27 - Dry Garlic and Coconut chutney.

Garlic Chutney

Pulling out one of my older recipes I'd posted on Food 52 (shoring up all the dishes I made in June for July  posts!
This dry chutney is a staple condiment for classic Indian street foods like Vada Pao, & bhajias (tempura made with almost any vegetatable coated with a spiced chickpea batter .
  • 2 tablespoons shredded fresh coconut (OR) 2 tablespoons dessicated coconut
  • 1/4-1/2 teaspoon Cayenne pepper powder
  • 1teaspoon Aleppo pepper flakes
  • 1 clove garlic
  • Sea Salt to taste
  1. In a Mortar, combine all the ingredients & pound till the garlic has completely been minced & incorporated into the powder.

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