Skip to main content

How to prep a Jackfruit and announcing a giveaway from OXO



 Think of fruit and one expects to nosh on a healthy crunchy / succulent orb with an ethereal aroma, NOT something you have to dissect like a caveman sawing through a mammoth carcass.  Well with the jack fruit it is exactly that. It starts with the sheer physical weight &  size of the fruit which can range from anywhere from 20 - 80 lbs and measures up to 50 inches in length. The Stalk that attaches the fruit to the tree trunk (yep it grows on the main trunk, since the branches would probably break under the weight!) needs to be sawed to detach the fruit.. (kinda make one nostalgic for picking an apple off a tree, doesn't it!). And this is the easy part. 




Well, here's a tutorial for the successful extraction of the divine arils that make you work for the reward of savoring the inimitable flavor. Thanks to the presence of an Ether compound that confers the jack fruit its characteristic flavor & aroma (which is funky & takes a little getting used to), the flavor is a combination of apple, banana & pineapple. 


This was a 40 lb specimen

Step 1. Get yourself a section of the fruit (or a whole fruit if you're feeling extra brave) from any Indian or Oriental grocery. They make their appearance at this time of the year.


Step 2: liberally coat your spare chef's knife with a good quality cooking oil (preferably one which does not have an assertive flavor of its own), and keep a pack of Band aids Handy. (or invest in a Kevlar glove)


Step 3: Make 2 perpendicular deep cuts slicing through the central Pithy core (which oozes a sticky latex). Now cut along the green leathery outer skin and detach the wedges. Stretch back the green peel against its normal curvature to expose the golden kernels of fruit from among the matted fibrous entities that didn't quite make the cut to carry a seed!



Using a paring knife, cut across the base to remove the fruit



Pile up the fruits in a bowl (~ 2 lbs)

and the remaining 6 lbs of waste in a trash bag.


Use the fleshy arils to whip up some delicious Jack fruit Pate.




Don't even think of discarding the seeds. they have a flavor and texture similar to chestnuts and are boiled or roasted and eaten in a similar fashion. You can find some chestnut recipes here & here.


Coming up on my next post: a Giveaway from OXO and a recipe for a comfort food breakfast rice crepe.











Comments

  1. Shyamala Ramanathan EdwardsMay 5, 2013 at 12:20 PM

    "funky"? FUNKY? Glorious, I call it! Funky is its evil twin, the durian! :)

    ReplyDelete
  2. Just covering my bases...(personally i love the umami ness of the aroma!)

    ReplyDelete
  3. is there any fruit on earth that can beat a jack fruit?? Heck. No! I m a jack fruit die hard fan in and out. And well written post, Niv. Will come in handy for folks who dont get cut jackfruit like we souls in India do!

    ReplyDelete
  4. a fruit that is worth all the messy and hard work!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Thank you for this delightful read. Your writing is as succulent as the fruit itself :)

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

I'd love to hear feedback from you, your thoughts, ideas and suggestions.

Popular posts from this blog

Memories of School and Canteen food (the St. Anthony's Sandwich Chutney)!

September 5th.. every year..
The day is celebrated as Teacher's Day in India where I grew up and went to school. The day, we girls  (My Alma Mater, St. Anthony's Girls High School in Chembur, a suburb of Mumbai,  was an all girls convent run by the sisters of St. Joseph's Convent) would trip over ourselves to give our class teachers bouquets of flowers that we'd all bought from the lone florist 'Bhaiyya' who had a little set up of planks set up over the storm drain outside the compound walls of Saroj Hotel in Chembur Market. I vaguely remember he had 2 selections, a 5 rs. and a 10 Rs. A watchful eye ensured that the two rose buds in the bouquet were fresh and the there was a respectable amount of asters and chrysanthemums. And the cheaper goldenrods were kept to an optimum low!


Resolutions, part deux.

Some of us get to make resolutions not once, but twice every year. The first of course, on January 1st along with the rest of the world and the second time around, the last day of  the Indian festival of Navaratri, The 10th day that marks the end of the festival is known as Vijaya Dashami - the day when scores of kids , willing or not,  are marched off to commence music, dance classes or start learning to play an instrument.

Navratri, once you strip it of its patriarchal trappings, is an empowering festival celebrating the Mother Goddess. Each day, her various attributes (a daughter, a mother, a wife, a warrior, an intellectual,  as an unfettered free spirit etc.) are explored and worshiped. and thefood offering invariably is a protein rich Sundal made with various lentils - a meat substitute, a nod to a pre-Buddhist era when meat was an accepted part of Hinduism.



Back to the resolutions.. you'd have to have been living in a cave this past year not to have been made aware of how …

Aug 9 - Cauliflower Kolhapuri

I have a dear friend from school who lives in the City of Kolhapur in Maharashtra. When I visited her  at the gorgeous heritage resort she owns there en route to a holiday in Goa, she gifted me with a spice blend that I treasured to the last speck. It sat  at the bottom of my freezer and was doled out for special dishes just like Saffron is rationed out in many Indian homes. Its a lip smacking flaming  hot blend of onions, garlic and the famed Kolhapuri Mirch (red chili).

I marinaded cauliflower florets in a paste of this spice blend , salt and oil, and roasted it in a 450 F oven. Finished with a handful of green coriander berries, this was a fabulous treat paired with roomali roti.