Skip to main content

Feasting my way to weight loss - A New Years resolution


I made a promise that I would reward myself with a complete break from posting after my daily marathon of A Dish a Day in 2012 and believed that  it was wonderful not having to constantly think about a new dish to post on January 1st 2013. Or so I thought. As much as I relished the welcome break of not touching my camera for seven days, The withdrawal symptoms drove me batty. It was hard stopping myself from going nuts at the grocery store and restraining my arms from picking each & everything that was remotely interesting. I made a compromise with myself that this year, I would resolutely focus on dishes that were healthy, delicious and came with the nutritive values attached.

I've been hooked on to fresh green garbanzos for a while now and never miss an opportunity to pick up some whenever I spot them. The texture is poles apart compared to the dried version (even the green dried ones). These are closer to edamame (fresh green soy beans)  in terms of their silky creamy mouth feel with the slightest of peach fuzz texture. & no trace of that starchy mealy texture that cooked dried garbanzos have. And the best part, Its pretty  low in calories , just about 250 calories per cup that fills you up completely.



I came across a recipe for Balilah in Yotam Ottolenghi's cookbook, Jerusalem. What made me fall in love with this was that it was a Middle Eastern version of a comfort snack food that my dad introduced me to from ONE particular street vendor in Mumbai in 1998. He insisted that I try the snack just for observing the sheer attention to detail that that food vendor lavished on each cone of the 'chane ki chaat' (chick pea chaat). (This was a 'defining' moment for me, an unforgettable lesson to cast aside food snobbery and appreciate street food for what it is.) The resulting dish was a bejeweled mix of green chickpeas and ruby red pomegranate arils, interspersed with the tiniest bits of sweet onion and pinpricks of heat from finely, almost-minced green chiles. As I made this for today's lunch, the memories came flooding back and the resulting version of my appetizer was a blend of similar street foods from two great culinary traditions. (With some improvisation thrown in!).



 I opted to used mashed up preserved lemons but regular lemon juice with some lemon zest works just as well.


Balilah with fresh green garbanzo & pomegranate:
(4 servings as a salad or 2 as a complete meal)

2 cups fresh green garbanzos 
1 cup pomegranate arils (~ 1/2 a pomegranate fruit)
1/4 cup finely chopped shallots or red onions
1/2 cup finely chopped parsley 
1/4  preserved lemon, (or juice of 1/2 a lemon and 1 teaspoon lemon zest)
cracked pepper to taste
1 teaspoon finely powdered cumin seeds
Salt to taste

Steam the green garbanzos for about 10 minutes. rinse completely in cold water to stop cooking and drain. Combine with the pomegranate arils and the shallots.  Deseed the preserved lemon and mince the pulp and peel finely Add t the  garbanzos along with the cumin powder, peppercorn and the parsley. Taste and adjust for seasoning, the preserved lemon is quite salty so you may wnat to be careful with adding any extra salt . If using the lemon juice, add salt to taste along with the citrus.

Nutritional Info 

2 cups green garbanzo : 480 Cal (12 WW points)
1 cup pomegranate : 60 Cal (2 WW points)
1/4 cup shallots : 30 Cals (1 WW points)
Total calories / serving:  ~ 150 Cal ( ~ 4 WW points per generous serving)
The other ingredients, being primarily flavorants of the non calorific kinds, I've omitted the  nutritional values, 



If you're interested in picking up a copy of Yotam Ottolenghi's book Jerusalem, here is the link from Amazon.


Comments

  1. Yumm yumm yumm I looooooove fresh Garbanzo..i want the whole bowl Niv.. Beautiful colors....

    ReplyDelete
  2. I totally agree Pavithra, nothing beats fresh shucked garbanzos, even the 'fresh' frozen ones. As tempted as I was to add other veggies like cukes & pepper, this dish tastes best with just these 2 ingredients!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Fresh garbanzo transports me to the winter holidays I spend with my masi in Nagpur. We ate fresh garbanzo just as like peas, in usals and even slightly roasted with salt like peanuts. Will try this salad as I am looking for ways to reduce some lbs and keep them off till I can manage.
    Love Ash.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Happy New Year Niv. I want to reduce our meat portions this year and concentrate on veggies. Where did you get the green garbanzos ? Is it the same which were sold by bushels in India especially in trains ?

    ReplyDelete
  5. I got these at the Apna Bazar Cash & Cary at Edison BongMOm. Is a bit of added effort to shell them but its so well worth it. These are the green versions of the bigger Kabuli chana garbanzos rather than the smaller ones we get in India which are the kala chana variety.

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

I'd love to hear feedback from you, your thoughts, ideas and suggestions.

Popular posts from this blog

Memories of School and Canteen food (the St. Anthony's Sandwich Chutney)!

September 5th.. every year..
The day is celebrated as Teacher's Day in India where I grew up and went to school. The day, we girls  (My Alma Mater, St. Anthony's Girls High School in Chembur, a suburb of Mumbai,  was an all girls convent run by the sisters of St. Joseph's Convent) would trip over ourselves to give our class teachers bouquets of flowers that we'd all bought from the lone florist 'Bhaiyya' who had a little set up of planks set up over the storm drain outside the compound walls of Saroj Hotel in Chembur Market. I vaguely remember he had 2 selections, a 5 rs. and a 10 Rs. A watchful eye ensured that the two rose buds in the bouquet were fresh and the there was a respectable amount of asters and chrysanthemums. And the cheaper goldenrods were kept to an optimum low!


Resolutions, part deux.

Some of us get to make resolutions not once, but twice every year. The first of course, on January 1st along with the rest of the world and the second time around, the last day of  the Indian festival of Navaratri, The 10th day that marks the end of the festival is known as Vijaya Dashami - the day when scores of kids , willing or not,  are marched off to commence music, dance classes or start learning to play an instrument.

Navratri, once you strip it of its patriarchal trappings, is an empowering festival celebrating the Mother Goddess. Each day, her various attributes (a daughter, a mother, a wife, a warrior, an intellectual,  as an unfettered free spirit etc.) are explored and worshiped. and thefood offering invariably is a protein rich Sundal made with various lentils - a meat substitute, a nod to a pre-Buddhist era when meat was an accepted part of Hinduism.



Back to the resolutions.. you'd have to have been living in a cave this past year not to have been made aware of how …

Aug 9 - Cauliflower Kolhapuri

I have a dear friend from school who lives in the City of Kolhapur in Maharashtra. When I visited her  at the gorgeous heritage resort she owns there en route to a holiday in Goa, she gifted me with a spice blend that I treasured to the last speck. It sat  at the bottom of my freezer and was doled out for special dishes just like Saffron is rationed out in many Indian homes. Its a lip smacking flaming  hot blend of onions, garlic and the famed Kolhapuri Mirch (red chili).

I marinaded cauliflower florets in a paste of this spice blend , salt and oil, and roasted it in a 450 F oven. Finished with a handful of green coriander berries, this was a fabulous treat paired with roomali roti.