Skip to main content

Quick healthy fix for a crazy week - Wintermelon & mung bean stew


 It takes a really steely resolve to keep with a strict regimen when you're down with a combined case of the flu and a cold. The best that one can do under these circumstances is try to stay hydrated and fill up on soups and light stews. When half a ton of stress is added (by way of the little ones falling sick, its time to put any regimen up on a shelf, it can begin to grate on you and the last thing you need is to start resenting a resolution). Tales of my Carb-loading kitchen capers will be posted on the 24th of the month.. stay tuned! In the mean time, here is a sneak peek!





When it comes to favorites in the vegetable kingdom, I'd rank the white fleshed winter melon up there at the top. there is something about its crisp yet yielding texture with the explosion of pure liquid when you bite into a well cooked cube.

Winter melon is traditionally cooked with a coconut cumin and red chile paste which provide the bulk of its calories. a healthy and hearty alternative is to use cooked split mung dal instead. I found that the hearty flavors of the mung and vegetal lightness of the winter melon shone beautifully when the stew was spiced minimally. The best part, a chunk of the calories comes from the tablespoon of oil used for the tempering, which is pretty semi optional.

Mung beans and Winter melon stew: (serves 3 generously as a meal by itself)

You need: 
4 cups winter melon cubed ( 40 cals, 2 WW plus points)
 1/2 cup split mung beans (300 cals , 7 WW plus points)
1/4 teaspoon turmeric
1 pinch asafetida (optional)
1 green birds eye or serrano chile split longitudinally
1 sprig curry leaves
2- 3 cups water
Salt to taste

For the tempering:
1 tablespoon oil (120 cals, 4 WW plus points)
1 teaspoon mustard seeds
1 teaspoon split Urad dal
1 small arbol chile

Rinse, clean and drain the mung dal. Add the water, turmeric, split green chile and turmeric.  Bring to a boil,  lower the heat and allow the mung dal to cook until its soft yet retains its shape. Add the cubed winter melon along with the curry leaves , optional asafetida and salt. Allow to cook on a low heat until the winter melon turns translucent.


Heat the oil and add the ingredients for tempering. Once the mustard pops, the Urad and arbol chile turn a reddish brown ( I burnt it a bit in the photograph above) , add the tempering to the stew. Serve hot with a cup of fresh steaming plain rice. Given that Weight watchers does not assign points to vegetables, this dish tops out at a measly 4 points without the rice.





and yes, I confess, I also went ahead and created a fabulous fattening spiced Persimmon & blood orange mousse, which I promise to share in future posts! Bon Appetit!



Comments

  1. Beautiful Clicks Niv. Your Mung beans and winter melon stew looks so refreshing and inviting. Looking forward to this delightful mousse and your exotic bread recipes

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

I'd love to hear feedback from you, your thoughts, ideas and suggestions.

Popular posts from this blog

Summer Grilling - Grilled Halloumi with herb/avocado spread and pineapple

Depending upon cultures, its interesting to see how people react to the advent of summer. In India, It was to confine yourself indoors for the fear of getting a dark tan, stepping out with an umbrella to shield oneself from the intense sun and a host of 'cooling' foods such as Yogurt rice, and chilled fruits. The very idea of grilling anything out in the blazing sun would send a shudder down the spine. Grilling over coals was confined to cooler months and the rainy season when vendors would stroll the streets with carts full of corn to be roasted in a 'Sigri' (a Coal oven made of sheet metal). In sharp contrast, With the advent of Memorial Day in the US of A, there's a scramble to get the  grills and  barbecues readied for cooking foods the way our   cave men ancestors used to. Meat, Meat & more Meat, with a tiny footnote for grilling veggie burgers and marinaded vegetables.  Well, if you can't beat 'em, Join 'em! While that rallying

Product Review: Ninja Mega Kitchen system and a recipe for Masala Dosa

 One of the biggest reasons for attending conferences is the priceless experience of meeting fellow bloggers and get an invaluable exposure to all things  culinary. This includes vendors with new products to savor and get inspiration from. I had no complaints about whatever appliances I had for making traditional Dosa (Traditional South Indian rice & lentil crepes) batter, a sturdy tabletop stone grinder that you could add the Urad dal, turn the timer on , and 30  minutes later, come back to a container full of fluffy, batter with the consistency of whipped egg whites. The The cons of this is the cleaning up, of the various parts, the roller, the grinding bin, the multiple trays on which the rollers need to be placed while transferring the rice & lentil batter, the invariable drips of thick batter on the counter.... you get the point, It takes quite a bit of time. I was pleasantly surprised when the appliance company, Ninja asked me if I'd like to try any of their

Khandvi deconstructed.. Chickpea flour Spaghetti & Pappardelle Pasta

Khandvi may well be my all time favorite noshing 'tiffin' tea time snack & quite possibly  because it can be pretty intimidating at first sight. a beautiful, almost impossible vision to behold, gossamer thin, jellied strips of chickpea flour & sour yogurt, tiny miniature savory Swiss rolls that delightfully wobble in your mouth before delicately disintegrating & gliding  down your throat, making way for... the next little morsel!