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Pleonasms...and a recipe to match!





Its been a bountiful summer, in that every week I manage to get a couple of food sessions done with veggies picked from my own back yard. This week it was half a dozen decent sized tomatoes. The thing with such personal experiences with produce, is that you want to ensure that they are used in dishes that are specially created. In a sense thanking them for the priceless opportunity of sampling food at its sun kissed best.



These tomatoes found their way into a dish that in all fairness, is  in search of a better name. You see,
 I happen to  belong to the foodie camp that cringes at hearing terms like 'Chai  Tea' and 'Paneer cheese'. Pleonasms, as they are called, refers to redundant words paired together, such as 'join together' or 'exact same'.

So here I was with a recipe idea that seemed quite deliciously possible and ingredients to match,  - organic tomatoes from the backyard, Organic Tofu from Whole Foods Market in Princeton . Frozen edamame pods from Trader Joes. and no proper name to give it. As a place holder, I've christened it Pleonasmic Edamame Tofu until I can think of something better.I'm not sure if I've give it an A+ in the novelty rankings, but its definitely a keeper of a recipe.

Pleonasmic Edamame Tofu:



You need:
  For the  Masala Paste:
  • 1 large white onion (about 1 cup chopped)
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 2 inch piece ginger, chopped
  • 2 tablespoons coriander seeds
  • 3 teaspoons cumin seeds
  • 4-5 whole pods cardamom
  • 6-7 cloves
  • 1 inch piece of cassia bark cinnamon (yet another pleonasm??)
  • 6-9 black peppercorns
  • 2 teaspoons dry mango powder or sumac
  • 1 Serrano chile chopped
Edamame Tofu:
  • 1 packet extra firm Tofu
  • Cayenne chili powder to taste
  • 1/4 + 1/4 teaspoon Turmeric powder (total 1/2 teaspoon)
  • 3 cups boiled and peeled green edamame
  • 6 ripe tomatoes, finely chopped
  • Salt to taste
  • 2 + 3 tablespoons Olive oil (total 5 tablespoon)
  • 1 cup water or vegetable stock
  • 1/4 cup Yogurt
  • 2 tablespoons Heavy cream
  • Chopped cilantro for garnish
Combine all the ingredients for the masala paste and blend into a smooth paste using as little water as possible.

Drain the water from the tofu and pat dry completely using paper towels. Cut into 1/2 inch cubes and combine with 2 tablespoon oil, 1/4 teaspoon turmeric, salt (as per your taste, ~ 1/2 teaspoon) and Cayenne chile powder. Set aside to marinade for about 1 hour.

Heat the remaining oil in a skillet and add the masala paste. Cook on a low heat until any water completely evaporates. Now add the chopped tomatoes along with the remaining turmeric. Cook down to a thick paste.


Add the edamame to the tomato mixture, adjust for salt. Add the water / stock and cover. Simmer on a low flame while you prepare the tofu.

In a non stick skillet, add the cubed tofu in 2 or 3 batches and toast until the surfaces turn brown. Shake the skillet to turn the individual cubes. (minimizing the use of a spatula ensures that the cubes do not break up).

Add the tofu cubes to the edamame 'curry'. cover and allow to simmer for 5-10 minutes to allow the flavors to combine.

Whip the yogurt and cream together until smooth and drizzle over the curry. gently stir to combine. (Omit this if you want a vegan version, ) Transfer to a serving dish & Garnish with cilantro. Serve hot with plain jasmine or basmati rice.

For a vegan version of the yogurt / cream finishing ingredient, I'd suggest, soaking 1/4 cup of cashew nuts in 1/2 a cup of almond milk and grinding the nuts into a smooth paste.




 Bon Appetit!

What are your Favorite examples of foodie Pleonasms??

Comments

  1. So they'r called pleonasms! :)
    Naan bread and Roti bread.......

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yep they are.. I'd almost forgotten about Roti & naan bread..

      Delete
  2. You try finding an apt name for the dish and until such time I will just drool on the pictures. I an so envious of you for those "decent"size produce. Lately i bought one tomato that size for Naira 524/=(Naira 2000 for a kilo)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yikes... that sounds expensive.. whats the conversion rate?

      Delete
    2. don't even bother to calculate......it is EXPENSIVE! We convert one US Dollar to Naira 150 :(

      Delete
  3. nirmala varatharajanMay 3, 2013 at 10:35 AM

    Tried the dish with tofu sourced from the local Nilgiris store. For the edamame, I used frozen mochai and it turned out pretty good.

    ReplyDelete

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